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Insurance for Property

  • Homeowners Insurance

    Do you know how much your belongings are worth? The figure is often much more than our customers initially think. Taking the time to assess what you own, and to understand how your coverage works, can help you make sure everything you value is adequately covered.

    Contact Us to Discuss:

    • Insuring Your Home’s Structure
    • Personal Property Insurance
    • Guest Medical Coverage
    • Flood Insurance
    • Any other insurance related questions you might have!

  • Renters Insurance

    Your landlord has insurance, but it probably only covers the building where you live, not your belongings or your liability for accidents.

    If someone is injured during an accident in your home, renters insurance will help protect you in the case a liability lawsuit.

    Why Have Renter’s Coverage:

    • Protect your personal property
    • Coverage for your guests
    • Typically less than $20/month
    • Give yourself peace of mind
  • Condo Insurance

    Condo insurance is required to insure your personal property and any parts of your unit that aren’t covered by your condo association’s insurance policy.

    Your association could have one of three policies:

    • a policy that insures only the primary building and common areas;
    • a policy that insures your building and any items in your unit other that are not personal property;
    • a policy that insures the building, your unit, and any fixtures or improvements you make to your unit.

     

    Contact an Agent Today
    888-588-9245
  • Libility Insurance

    Liability Insurance:

    is a part the general insurance system of risk financing to protect the purchaser (the “insured”) from the risks of liabilities imposed by lawsuits and similar claims. It protects the insured in the event he or she is sued for claims that come within the coverage of the insurance policy.

    It is designed to offer specific protection against third party insurance claims, i.e., payment is not typically made to the insured, but rather to someone suffering loss who is not a party to the insurance contract.